10 Day Cultural Tour in Israel

The tour includes the itinerary of the 8 Day Cultural tour in Israel plus 2 extra days.


Day 9 of the Cultural Tour in Israel

Flexible day with multiple options!

 

Beer Sheba is the largest city in the southern Negev desert region. It dates back to ancient times which we will explore at Tel Beer Sheba National park, a UNESCO heritage site. Originally settled in the 4th century BC, the city was an important government center of the Kingdom of Judah and had its own water system including one of the deepest wells in Israel.  

 

We will proceed to the modern-day Beersheba which is one of the largest metropolitan areas in southern Israel founded at the start of the 20th century. The Bedouin Farmers Market is an excellent place to sample fresh fruits and vegetables.  

 

For the remainder of the day, there are many destinations from which to choose, depending upon your preferences. Biblical cities such as Bethlehem and Beth Shemesh could be considered or a visit Elah Valley in the Judean Mountains. Here there is a stunning panoramic view of the location where King Saul and the men of Israel gathered for battle with the Philistines. 

 

For a change of pace, a visit to the Latrun Monastery in the Ayalon valley is famous for its olive oil and wine. The Yad Lashiryon Museum would be an excellent choice. It is the official memorial for soldiers from the Armored Corps who fell in combat and also the largest and most diverse display of tanks in the world. For other options, just ask me!

 

Day 10 of the Cultural Tour in Israel

The last day of our tour will be spent in Tel Aviv!

 

According to Trip Advisor, Tel Aviv was ranked third most popular destination in the Middle East. With 14 km of sandy beaches, diverse population, local attractions and celebrated nightlife, it is not surprising there are 2.5 million tourists visiting every year.

 

The city is also known as the historical birthplace of the State of Israel when the Independence Declaration was signed on May 14, 1948 was signed by the first Prime Minister David Ben Gurion. We will visit the building where the newly established government met for the first time.  

 

The American-German Colony is a small neighborhood settled in 1866 by The Christian Lovers of Zion from Maine. A group of 157 men, women and children arrived to prepare for the establishment of a Jewish nation. The endeavor was disastrous with only 24 settlers remaining after just two years.  In 1869, German Templers arrived, bought the abandoned property and successfully established residence. The Emmanuel Church was built in 1904. 

 

Our next destination is ancient Jaffa, one of the oldest surviving seaports in the world. The first known recorded reference to the city is found in the Egyptian Harris papyrus that dates to 1440 BC. The sweeping view of Tel Aviv along the Mediterranean Sea is stunning. 

 

We will visit the famous St. Peter’s Church of the Franciscan Order which was built to commemorate Peter’s visit and his miraculous raising of Tabitha (Dorcas) from the dead (Acts 9:36-43) and then house where St. Peter stayed. There are numerous art galleries tucked in the narrow streets which wind down to the Port where we will have our farewell dinner.